Rescue Program

The heart and soul of Front Range Equine Rescue’s work.

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All horses in the rescue program receive routine veterinary care as well as any emergency care needed.

Direct rescue involves saving horses from abusive situations, providing rehabilitation, training evaluation and adoption to qualified homes. A small number of horses retire with Front Range when they are unlikely to adopt but are still in overall good health. Direct rescue also involves providing humane euthanasia for horses debilitated or suffering from various conditions including disease or severe injury where quality of life is diminished.

Horses are obtained from auctions, kill lots, animal control impound, abandonment cases, and owner surrender.

Incoming horses with unknown backgrounds are quarantined from the general herd and each other when entering the rescue at different times. Front Range focuses on saving abused and neglected horses with emphasis on those bound for slaughter. Front Range Equine Rescue is not authorized to investigate/seize abused horses, but has a history of working with animal control when needed. To report suspected abuse/neglect, contact your local humane society or animal control.

All horses in the rescue program receive routine veterinary care as well as any emergency care needed. This care includes Coggins test, vaccinations, de-worming, dental care, and regular farrier care. As needed, rescue horses are given supplementation, such as nutritional (i.e., vitamins/minerals, probiotics) or for conditions such as arthritis. Horses are also provided complementary therapies including, but not limited to, chiropractic, acupuncture, homeopathics, herbal remedies, etc. Once rehabilitated, all horses undergo training assessment prior to being placed up for adoption to qualified homes.

Indirect rescue plays a critical role in Front Range’s mission to end the abuse and neglect of horses. Direct rescue is limited by available shelter, funding and people needed to properly care for horses and facilities. Indirect rescue is an important way to help more at risk horses.

Indirect rescue includes special programs like “Stop the Backyard Breeder” and “Trails End” and re-homing tips for horse owners. Front Range Equine Rescue has provided assistance during fire evacuations and during times of economic crisis. Front Range’s solutions to horse slaughter are another form of indirect rescue as are its legal campaigns to protect wild horses and responsibly end horse slaughter.

Rescue horses are currently kept in Colorado and Virginia with a small retired herd residing in Florida. Horses available for adoption are located in Colorado and Virginia and can be viewed here.

Click here for ways you can help support the rescue program.

For more information, please contact us.

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